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02/10/2014

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griet

i cannot help but wonder... do the gates really close?
as 13 yr old hannah said this morning, upon me sharing my confusion regarding this understanding:"no, the gates do not close; more gates are simply opening up."
i certainly homeschooled my kids in waldorf ways as much for me as for them. i needed the nourishment that came with jumping math tables in the sand, crafting gnomes and fairies to be used during weeklong stories, or setting up challenge courses on michaelmas. i myself needed to go back into that mystery and absolute delight that was missing in my own early childhood. i recently started laying out a nature table again (as per your and erin's inspiration actually), for that particular magical realm continues to feed me and brings a depth of quiet joy that is hard to explain.
now, moving forward with an early teen and young lad who has moved beyond the gates of early childhood, i see that they both visit with ease the different realms you are describing, brenna. they still delight in visits from st nicholas and easter bunny, and they both love any scientific conversation or research project. there is no contrast for them. as if the access and permission given to their journey in comforting and magical realms in their early years have allowed for very rich and fertile soil, from which now the other realities grow and come into being.
that soil, when nurtured, cannot be taken away, for it provides the ground of interconnection, i believe.
and from your telling, it sounds like ida is beautifully finding her own way with how different pieces and realms can fit together.
with love and gratitude for your sharing!

Storymama

Thank you for sharing this, Griet. It is so helpful to hear from mothers of older children- to get that kind of perspective. That ability to take delight in it all, the rational and the imaginative is exactly what I hope for for my kids.

Certainly the spiritual world is open to all people. Perhaps the change that I'm calling a gate is not the ability to love or believe in the spiritual/imaginative realm but the ability to experience it in it in a literal way. When Emmet "sees" a gnome, he really sees it. It's not a kind of pretending or longing, but an actual experience. Ida and I are on the side of longing, loving, remembering, honoring. But maybe not seeing. On most days.

Of course some adults are able to keep their ability to directly experience the spiritual world, while others regain in through spiritual practice.

Robby spent yesterday in a workshop on making music with people in the dying process. After reading this post he shared that the elderly people he was with seemed to have reentered the magical realms. The so-called "second childhood" can perhaps be a gift in that way.

Thank you for joining the conversation, Griet!


Rachel

This is very lovely. I'm glad to have read it.

Storymama

Thank you for stopping by, Rachel. I just peeked at your Mineralogy unit- very inspiring! There surely is wonder beyond the ninth year!

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